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Home » Who Were the People Who Writed in Mesopotamis?

Who Were the People Who Writed in Mesopotamis?

As a New York Times bestselling author and leading cultural historian, Robert Bly writes, “When we think about the origins of literature, we often think about Greece and Rome, and it is true that some of the first novelists and playwrights were from there. But the literary tradition that emerged in ancient Mesopotamia was equally, if not more, original and vibrant.” Bly continues: “For centuries before the birth of Christ, ordinary people in Mesopotamia were creating fictional tales about their everyday lives. These were not simple stories told to amuse children; they were literature. And like all great literature, they spoke to the heart. They revealed what was most important to the people who wrote them.”

So who were these early Mesopotamian authors and how did their work impact the world?

Who Were the First Authors To Write In Mesopotamia?

Mesopotamia, also known as “The Land Between the Rivers”, refers to the area between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in present-day Iraq. According to tradition, the region was first settled in approximately 2800 BC by a man named Hammurabi, who built the cities of Babylon, Eridu, and Uruk. After him, many other great authors and poets from Mesopotamia wrote down important stories and poems that have been passed down through the ages.

The first known author from Mesopotamia was Aqhat, who lived in the 19th century BC. His works, the “Epic of Aqhat” and “The Descent of Aqhat”, are the first written records of the region. Scholars today still disagree about the exact nature of Aqhat’s works, but it is generally agreed that they were fictional stories about the Egyptian god Thoth and his adventures. Though Aqhat is credited with beginning the literary tradition in Mesopotamia, other Egyptian gods and mythical creatures also appear in his stories. This implies that Aqhat may not have been the first author from the region, but rather one of many.

Another famous author and poet from Mesopotamia is Akhil (a.k.a. “The Master”), who was active in the 3rd century BC. He is best known for his epic poem, “The Epic of Gilgamesh”, which tells the story of a great flood that overtook the earth. The poem is one of the earliest examples of a long poetic narrative in any language, and it has been popular amongst readers ever since its original publication. Thanks to its unusual length, “The Epic of Gilgamesh” has become one of the most challenging and rewarding works to study for scholars and enthusiasts alike. Akhil was originally from Babylonia but later lived in Egypt and wrote in praise of the Egyptian god Amun.

What Other Works By Authors From Mesopotamia Have Endured The Ages?

Many great works of literature have been inspired by or based on mythological characters and events from early Mesopotamian culture. Amongst these are William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”, François-René de Châteauguay’s “Pandora”, and James Joyce’s “Ulysses”. These works have all been incredibly influential, not only due to their groundbreaking plots but also because they allowed for a new form of literature to emerge that could be personal and even opinionated. Though they are all very different from each other, they all have something in common: they were all written by authors from Mesopotamia and have all been popular for hundreds of years.

The last author to feature on this list is Nabokov, who was born in the Russian province of Kabardia. He is best known for his novel “Lolita”, which was first published in Paris in 1923 and later turned into a film. The story revolves around Humbert Humbert’s obsessive, sexually charged relationship with the young, beautiful Dolores Haze. It is considered by many to be one of the greatest novels of all time. Though written more than 70 years ago, Nabokov’s “Lolita” has proven to be as influential as ever, both in terms of its literary merit and the public’s reaction to it. This can be attributed to Nabokov’s unique perspective and opinionated style. The following excerpt is from the introduction to “Lolita”, which was written by Nabokov in 1923:

“Lolita, my darling,” the reader will begin to feel that some long-forgotten spirit has whispered in his ear: “Lolita, my darling, you must not give up hope. One day, you will meet a girl, a rich girl, a beautiful girl, and your whole life will change forever.”

That’s what this whisper means. It means that some day, some rich and beautiful girl will come along and fall in love with you. And what’s more, she will love you just the way you are, abominably bad, repulsively ugly, indifferently clever, magnificently ignorant, contemptibly cowardly, unaccountably kind and sympathetic. She will adore you and make you the happiest man alive. Her name will be Dolores Haze and she will grow up to be a very remarkable woman.

Is there any way to prove that this is true? Of course, there is. The writers of antiquity have left us with ample evidence. Take a look at some of the greatest works of literature and you will see that they were all written by authors from Mesopotamia. Now, here’s a list of ten very significant and popular novels that were all written by authors from Mesopotamia, and which have all remained popular over the course of the ages.

10 Works By Authors From Mesopotamia That Have Endured The Ages

As mentioned before, many great works of literature have been inspired by or based on characters from early Mesopotamian culture. Amongst these are the ten listed below.

This list includes several French, English, and American novels, as well as one from Australia. Some are still in print and available to read, while others have been out of print for many years but remain popular through the ages thanks to Word of Mouth marketing (sometimes also referred to as “word of mouth marketing”). This is a type of marketing whereby consumers, through personal connections or social media platforms, are informed of upcoming books and can encourage others to read them as well.

Akhil’s Epic Of Gilgamesh

Akhil’s “The Epic of Gilgamesh” is the first work on this list, and it was originally published in 1856. The epic poem is one of the earliest examples of a long poetic narrative in any language, and it has been popular amongst readers ever since its original publication. Though written more than two thousand years ago, Akhil’s “The Epic of Gilgamesh” has continued to be popular amongst readers because it provides a unique perspective on the human condition. Akhil, the Master, was originally from Babylonia but later lived in Egypt and wrote in praise of the Egyptian god Amun. The poem tells the story of a great flood that overtook the earth, and it has been compared to the biblical story of Noah.

Chateauguay’s Pandora

“Pandora” was first published in 1886, and it was written by the French author and poet François-René de Châteauguay. The novella follows Saint-Jean, a French soldier, as he travels through Egypt. During his travels, Saint-Jean becomes infatuated with the mysterious Pandora and they subsequently have an affair. Though it was written more than 100 years ago, “Pandora” has remained popular through the ages because it is one of the earliest examples of a “gay novel” and it features an openly homosexual character named Marius. Because of its sensitivity and revolutionary ideas, “Pandora” was only published in censored editions in Châteauguay’s lifetime and remained out of print for many years, though it later saw a revival in interest when it was republished in the 1950s and 1960s.